A Financial Education Event
 

Summer Jobs For Kids

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Nifty Ways for Kids to Earn Money This Summer

The first job my sons Daniel and Philip ever had was a paper route. It gave them something to do during the summer, helped them start managing their finances and was even a little fun (at first). While we said they could only do it if they committed to it for a year, they occasionally passed duties on to their younger brothers, Jonathan (age 7 at the time) and Joshua (age 6).

While mama (age undisclosed) did the driving, the little boys did the delivering. On Joshua’s very first house, he grabbed the paper in his tight fist, barreled up the sidewalk, got his arm into an admirable wind-up and pitched the paper on top of the house! Rooftop-bound periodicals aside, allowing your kids to earn money can be a fun and prosperous adventure, as long as you’re willing to supervise them. Simply set boundaries that are appropriate and let them go to work.

Here are some great ideas to help your kids raise their own cash this summer while enjoying the benefits of earning, saving and sharing:

  • Rent-A-Kid – If you, a church or neighbor (someone you know) needs any odd jobs done, this is a great idea. When advertising the service, it’s important to plan early and be specific, polite and careful. You can even help your child make a small business card on the computer!
  • Washing cars and/or windows – This can be advertised similar to the Rent-A-Kid idea and only requires suds, soap and elbow grease. Focus on safe neighborhoods and quality work. Always accompany your child until you know the employer better.
  • Babysitting – A popular choice for young guys and girls, safety is key for this job. Encourage your child to take a babysitting/CPR course and babysitting people you know. Also, if they keep the house tidy and the kids happy, it can lead to repeat business.
  • Caring for pets – Since summer is a popular time for vacations, people are usually looking for affordable ways to care for their pets. For kids who like animals, this is perfect. Recommend they pass out flyers and visit the animal before they take the job.
  • Mowing lawns – For older kids, this is a go-to summer job and an excellent source of income. It can be dangerous, so it’s important to exercise caution and safety. Make sure they have the proper supply and safety gear and encourage a job well done (the best form of advertising).
  • Making and selling candy or drinks – Everyone loves candy, cool drinks and cookies/cakes, so this is a great option for the future chef. With permission, you can sell at sporting events, church bazaars, carnivals, festivals or farmer’s markets.

Before your kids take on a job this summer, be sure to think about safety, age-appropriate work, training, quality and following through. And after they’re finished, praise them for a job well done! Be sure they are working for family members or trusted friends and feel free to supervise their work by tagging along as long as they are young enough to need you!

What kind of summer job did you do as a kid?

Ellie Kay

America’s Family Financial Expert (R)

5 Ways to Stick to That Summer Budget!

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I love summer. It means a lot of fun things for the Kay Family. We have two weddings this year with one on Memorial day weekend and another in July! It means a lot of travel and budgeting to make sure we don’t go into debt!

Summer is a tough time for anyone to control spending, much less stay on a budget.  With the kids out of school and summer vacation around the corner, it’s a time when people fall victim to the thought, “I’ll go on vacation now and deal with the bills later.”

But there are ways to cut back on spending to stay on budget before summer hits. The three areas that require consumers to spend money on a regular basis, that do not go away with difficult economic times: groceries, gas and family essentials (such as clothing, birthday gifts, etc). You can plan for summer and still stay on budget for these “little” areas that add up to big expenses. Here are some questions I got when I went on ABC NEWS that you might find helpful.

Q. Ellie, we often think of the holidays as a difficult time to stay on a personal finance budget, but this time of the year is really is a difficult time to stay as well. There are end of the school year gifts to buy, vacations to plan and a summer clothes to get for the kids. We have to start somewhere, and you say the first step is to start with a plan?

ELLIE: Yes, it’s amazing how kids keep growing every year and the summer clothes they wore last season are two sizes too small this year. But having a plan is a good place to start and while the basic a plan is a budget,  now is the time to break down the household budget into a plan for the more manageable subsections. This time of year, stores and websites are cleverly designed to get you to spend more than you intended. So it’s important to know what you are going to get and spend before you go to the mall or online. This plan will take into consideration past spending behavior and any impulse buys that tend to kick in while you’re in spending mode. Write down what you are going to spend in the little areas and be specific. If your two preschoolers need clothing, then conduct an inventory of what each of them has—including any hand-me-downs and the vacation gear they may need for the entire season. If you’re planning a vacation and find that you will eat fewer meals at home because you’re going to be away, then don’t budget the same amount for the grocery store. Otherwise, you’re adding spending upon spending when you should be cutting in one area and adding in another.

Q. So we have a plan, the next step is to not fall for questionable “deals.” What do you mean by this?

ELLIE: This time of year, you’ll see sales on summer clothing, electronics and even summer foods—all the things that people are thinking about as the school year winds down and vacation time starts to gear up. But not all sales are created equal and you may see a lot of $90 digital cameras and $100 GPS sales but there can be a huge difference in the models. So before you pick up a steal of a deal, do a general price search on the specific model at Shopping.com or amazon.com before you get too excited. Plus, if you go into the store and they do not have it in stock, ask for a substitute that is an upgrade from the model that is on sale. You’ll be surprised at how much you can save by just asking. It’s also important to read the fine print in a sale advertisement. If there is a “limited quantity” or “no substitutions” then that could impact your spending plan. Finally, look at the whole world of “price comps” this is where a store offers to match the price of competitors in any sale advertisement that you bring into the store. While one store may not have that GPS in stock and may not offer rainchecks, another store might match the sale and have plenty in stock. We’ve taken advantage of this kind of offer quite a few times, so much so that price comping has become a habit in our family. This can also save quite a bit of money and help to keep you on track in the “little” areas that can tend to torpedo the budget.

Q. So we have a plan, we’re not falling for questionable “deals” and now you say that the next step is “don’t miss any discounts.” How can this help keep us on track and what if there aren’t any discounts—especially for things like gas and other essentials?

ELLIE: Just because a store or website doesn’t mention a discount on merchandise or shipping on its site or in the ads doesn’t mean its not offering any. There is often a number out there in cyberspace that can be retried into either the promotional code box online or even a coupon code into the register at the mall. To find out if what you are buying has an additional discount, go to RetailMeNot.com on your computer or smartphone and enter the store’s name. Or you can go to CouponCabin.comBradsDeals.com and you may find digital coupons that you can download from the store’s websites.
The same principle applies in the grocery store or when filling up your tank with gas. Go to couponmom.com to save in the grocery store and Go to gaspricewatch.com to find the best values on gas. Don’t forget to check and see if the gas station may offer an unadvertised free car wash, cup of coffee or soda. I just found out that I could have been a lot more caffeinated, for free, at my neighborhood gas station when the attendant asked me, “are you going to get your free cup of coffee?” Once again, if you just do your research you’ll find all kinds of freebies and these “little” things, when multiplied and combined will add up to big savings if you create this awareness level.

Q. The final step you recommend in order to stay on budget in the little things is to use cash or debit cards. There are pros and cons to using debit instead of credit, what are your thoughts on this?

ELLIE: Yes, there is a time to use a credit card instead of debit when it comes to charges that you may dispute on your credit card or when you want an extended warranty or the added protection that comes from using a credit card. However, for these little areas, we tend to track the spending better by using cash or debit and consumers are far less likely to go into debt because people simply spend less when they are using cash according to the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Applied. Store clerks have long found that it is easier to persuade people who are using credit cards to spend more than they were intending. And when it comes to shopping online, you dn’t necessarily need a credit card to have more protection than using your debit card online. One other option that won’t get you into debt is to research the layaway plan at your local retailer by going to eLayaway.com

Happy Summer!
Ellie Kay
America’s Family Financial Expert (R)
http://www.elliekay.com/

Heroes at Home Financial Event – JBSA and Del Rio

“You crashed!”
Again?
It seems that every time I get in a simulator, I either run off the runway before I take off or I crash it once I get airborne.
I suppose I’ll leave the flying to the pilots in the family!

We’ve officially launched our 2016 Heroes at Home Financial Event with the help of our friends at #USAA. We are meeting great military members from all branches at Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA). Every attendee received a “Command Your Cash” from the USAA Educational Foundation through their MFRC or AFRC. At the back of that book is information on how to have the Ed Foundation bring a course on “Command Your Cash” to your military unit. We also gave away 100 copies of the choice of two of my books: either “Heroes at Home” or “Lean Body, Fat Wallet.”
Our high energy millennial emcee, Bethany Grace, kept the fun level high in the room and gave away quite a few gift cards and an IPad at the end of the events.

Bethany Grace, Ingrid Bruns and Ellie Kay at Laughlin AFB

One of the things that struck me about the men and women of JBSA was that they were part of a huge network of 11 units and billions of dollars of military assets, yet they had their own identity. This was evident in our tours of Lackland AFB, Fort Sam and Randolph AFB.
Next, we immediately dovetailed a trip to Laughlin AFB in Del Rio where I connected with my friend, Beth, whose husband flew the Stealth F117A with my husband a few years ago. She was instrumental in the kind of welcome we received there and I had the opportunity to speak to the military spouses the night before the main event.
As soon as we drove on to Del Rio, a buzz started traveling the base at warp speed and continued throughout the entire time we were there.

I loved seeing the flight line and hearing about the mission. The pride in the Airmen when we toured the Medical Facility, Fitness Center, and Altitude chamber was evident.

      When our four speakers are up on stage, presenting 20 minute segments of financial education, it’s a gratifying feeling to know that the audience is appreciative and eager to learn. But the greatest sense of all is the knowledge that these strangers in the audience are my tribe–my new friends and even my family. I love these military men and women and their families and my whole heart’s desire is to make their lives easier by helping them with their money matters. But I also leave them with the knowledge that they are loved and appreciated by America.

If every military audience gets one main message, I would want that to be:

We love you, we are so proud of you and together, we will be all right.

Ellie Kay

Sharing and Saving on Hotels

Spring break is here, and summer will be upon us before we know it. If you want to get away from the day-to-day, it can be difficult to work it into your budget. Since the recession, the idea of a “Staycation” has become popular, where a family camps out in the backyard, or does something special to make their time at home feel more like time away. While these are great ideas to save money for people on a budget, I believe there are other ways to get away from home and have an affordable vacation away. Here are some ways to get away for less:

Volunteer Your Way to a Cheaper Vacation: Steve and Debby Trigg first discovered their favorite family vacation spot when they had an ample budget for family fun. They went to a Christian campground in Colorado and fell in love with the staff, landscape, and activities. They also caught the vision of how combining ministry with vacation can help teach their kids the concept of servant missions.

When Steve had his hours cut back at work, they found their vacation budget reduced during those belt-tightening years. They opted to go back to the campground as staff for a week. While their workload was increased, they still had plenty of family time with a ministry emphasis. Steve said, “We decided to volunteer to teach our children the benefits of servant missions and NOT for the benefit of a low-cost vacation—that is a serendipitous blessing.”

Instead of paying $1000 for the week (which is still a bargain for those who are paid guests) they had a working vacation for free. Not all campgrounds offer this kind of a trade-off, but if your family enjoys this kind of environment, it would be worth your time to contact a local retreat center or campground. Go to Acacamps.org for the American Camping Association or try www.google.com and enter your state and “Christian Campground” to find a location near you.

Not all vacation packages are faith-based; some are education-based as well. At Family Hostel, HostelWorld.com, there are trips offered that match families with learning vacations around the world. There are even Elder Hostels, which offer those 55 and older up to 10,000 options starting at as little as $556 for a six day photography workshop in Massachusetts.

WildernessVolunteers.org is a nonprofit organization created in 1997, which offers people of any age a chance to help and maintain national parks, forests, and wilderness areas across the United States. Everything from trail maintenance to vegetation projects may be on the agenda. Participants provide their own camping gear and share campsite chores. Most Wilderness Volunteer trips last about a week and cost around $219.

Great Deals on Hotels: If you have a certain destination in mind, sometimes all you need is a hotel. Check out these sites that can help your vacation be just that much sweeter:

TravelZoo: If you are thinking of visiting a certain place, look under the Hotels tab on TravelZoo.com and pick your destination. It will show you the current deals. It will also give you the option to search prices on several sites. Just make sure you have your check in and out dates.

priceline.com: I love this site. I have used it to get amazing deals at unimaginable prices. The “Name Your Price” tool is a wonder. Start off low and work your way up! This also has International options.

hotels.com: Another great site for finding hotel deals and steals. A unique feature for hotels.com is their rewards program that can help you build up stays and earn a free night. It is never too late to save big with their “Last Minute Deals” tab for all the quick getaway trips.

kayak.com: This is another great site for hotels, as well as flights. It will search hundreds of travel sites to find you the best deals on the web. Through Kayak, you are able to save at least 25%, sometimes even more. You can even scan the popular cities on the home page in order to see what hotels are going for in the area.

No matter what your vacation budget is, it’s important to take time off from the real world to create and develop a meaningful time to foster friendship, marriage and family. In years to come, you may not recall the price of the condominium or quality of the room service, but you will remember those forever memories with the people you love—because they are priceless.

De-Stress for Less (Part 1)

De-stress for Less Part 1: On the Run

You can get the stress out of your life without breaking your budget if you follow a few steps to de-stress for less. Here are some creative ways to relax and be entertained while paying attention to your bottom line. I encourage you to pursue a sustainable lifestyle of balance, because the price we pay for living under constant stress is much too high. In fact, a CNN poll reveals that the number-one reason for stress in most countries is money.

The countries most stressed out by money are Malaysia, China, Singapore, and the United States. The countries least stressed out about money are Russia, France, and Italy. It would be self-defeating to ask you to be less stressed about money and then suggest ways to de-stress that cost a lot of money.

As a mom of many children, I was often a mom on the run. I’ve seen the price that people pay for never slowing down, and the cost can include frequent headaches, arthritis, high blood pressure, and even heart attacks. I determined when my children were young that I would learn to do things that relieved me of the pressures of a large and busy family. I also learned that some of the simplest activities could bring the most enjoyment. Here are some simple and free options I’ve used many times over the years to de-stress my life:

  • Take a power nap.
  • Listen to soothing music.
  • Listen to an audiobook.
  • People-watch on a bench.
  • Talk to God. Write out prayers for friends and family.
  • Light a candle.
  • Eat a sack lunch at a park or somewhere outside.
  • Take a stroll and stop to smell some roses.
  • Write in a journal in your backyard or in a garden.
  • Draw a picture of your house. Or backyard. Or somewhere that makes you happy.
  • Write out favorite quotes or passages of literature and put it somewhere you will see it.
  • Call a friend or family member you haven’t talked to in a while.

I know you are aware of these simple pleasures, but do you practice them? Intentional breaks from your usual routine can make a huge difference not only in your stress, but in your overall productivity later in the day.

Bonus De-Stress Tip:

Since the recession, the idea of a “stay-cation” has become popular, where a family camps out in the backyard or does something special to make their time at home feel more like a time away. While these are great ideas to save money for people on a budget, I believe there are other ways to get away from home and have an affordable vacation away. For one thing, you can check your local deals at httpe://www.groupon.com/, http:/travelzoo.com/, or http://livingsocial.com/ to get some really fun values. I went indoor skydiving for only $35 (a $110 value) and it changed my entire perspective! And don’t forget to check out Pinterest to see great ideas of fun activities

Ellie Kay

America’s Family Financial Expert (R) 

Wrapping Up Summer: Savings at Theme Parks

Before school starts is a great time to go to a local amusement park and have a last bit of family fun. If you are like my girlfriends and I, you might even want to go AFTER the kids are in school, so you can enjoy all the big girl rides without taking turns while your spouse watches the kids. But be careful, my besties ended up in jail when we went to California Adventure!  Here are my best tips to get the most out of your theme park experience and they will also keep you above the law: 

  1. Start with the Tickets: Full price should always be the last option, even when shopping for tickets to Theme parks. Always keep an eye out on little things like Coke cans, deals at local grocery stores, and online specials for discounted tickets to your favorite theme parks. Purchasing more days or “Park hopper” tickets will save you money if you choose to go for more than one day. AAA and AARP also have discounts on tickets. If you or a family member is in the military, check out the deals they have for military families. Disneyland has a 3-day park hopper pass for only $125, and military members can get up to 6 tickets per ID.
  2. Eat Breakfast in Your Room – Unless you’ve got a character meal or some other exciting option for breakfast, eat in your room! Some hotels offer free breakfast, so take advantage before you head out to the park. Leaving a free breakfast at the hotel is like leaving money on the table. You may even choose to bring a new box of cereal and disposable bowls and silverware. Buy milk (store it in the room if there is a mini-fridge) and have cereal in the room.
  3. Give each child a budget: Set a budget for the day and give a set amount to each child. This will account for food, treats, and souvenirs. Help them with the math along the way, and remind them that when the money is gone, there is no more but they may keep what is left over. It will save you (and them) from spending mindlessly, and it teaches children to spend money wisely, as well!
  4. Share – Sharing is one of the smartest ways to save money. Many portions are large enough for two, and you definitely don’t want o carry around left-overs around the park for the rest of the day! If the meal wasn’t enough, have snacks in your bag or order more food, but I think you will find that fruits you bring with you are satisfying and healthy, which brings us to our next tip.
  5. Bring Snacks – While this is not necessarily the time forgo little treats once in a while (can you say cream cheese filled pretzels at Disneyland?), curb the hunger before the next meal by carrying snacks with you. A granola bar, almonds or fruit that you carry around in your bag without it getting smashed or melting are good options. Depending on the park’s food policy, you may need to leave it in a locker outside the park or in your car (or room if it’s nearby) and eat it in the picnic area outside the park.
  6. Bring out the Kid in You – If there is not an even number to share a meal, or you would like another inexpensive option, adults can order Kid’s Meals at restaurants, and sometimes that’s all you need. There are some table service restaurants that prohibit it, but others will let an adult order a plus-size kid’s meal for a reasonable price (normally a few dollars more than the standard kid’s meal). Just ask at the restaurant when you arrive. Counter service restaurants will almost always let anyone order a kid’s meal.
  7. Eat Offsite – It’s very easy to eat offsite at Disneyland. At any point during the day, you can walk across the street and have several less expensive options within walking distance. McDonald’s, IHOP, Mimi’s Cafe, the list goes on. They’re convenient and can save you money, especially if you check RetailMeNot.com for discount coupons and codes (see more on point 9).
  8. DVC, AP, Disney Visa, D23 Discounts – When you eat on the property, ask about any discounts you may be eligible for. There are almost always Annual Passholder discounts, and there are others for Disney Vacation Club Members, D23 Members, or Disney Visa cardholders.
  9.  Several Downtown Disney Restaurants Have Coupons – There are lots of restaurant coupons out there, you just have to look! The Landry’s Select Club, which includes the Rainforest Café, typically gives $25 bonuses both for signing up and birthdays. By registering on the Simply Patina Group website, you can get a $30 birthday gift card. The Simply Patina Group includes Tortilla Jo’s, Catal, UVA Bar & Café, Taqueria, and Naples. Woo hoo! Food discounts!

10.  Entertainment Book Coupons – Order an Entertainment Book for Orange County, or another entertainment book for the area where your theme park is located. The Entertainment Books are chock full of possibilities. There are usually discounts for the Rainforest Café, Wetzel’s Pretzels and other area eateries. There are also deals for other great places in the area if you would like to see something else while you are there.

Whether it’s just you and your spouse, a group of girlfriends or your entire family, be sure to have guilt free fun by spending the least amount possible.

I’d love to hear YOUR ideas of how you save at theme parks!

Ellie Kay

America’s Family Financial Expert (R)

Identity Theft and Other Nightmares


My husband brought me the credit card bill and asked “What did you DO on your last trip to New York?” He was hurt and stunned, “This charges are to a tattoo shop, an liquor store and a series of bars. Please tell me this is some mistake!”
It was a classic case of identity theft. I may have been guilty of buying one too many lattes and pastries at Dean and Delucas in New York, but I had no new tattoos! I tried to respond to my hubby but couldn’t speak . . .
And then I woke up. Yes, I know. I’m a strange breed because my “nightmares” consist of dreams about identity theft. Unfortunately, those nightmares are other people’s reality.
According to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, it takes 12 months, on average, for a victim of identity theft to notice the crime. So how do you keep yourself safe from the ever growing threat of identity theft? Learn to identify the latest scams:

Phishing Scams – Never give your social security number, account numbers, date of birth or other personal information via email or on the phone unless you initiated the contact. Most major internet sites and financial institutions have been targeted including Citibank, PayPal, eBay, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and America Online (AOL). These scams usually show up in your email inbox with a message from the “System Administrator” telling you to perform some urgent maintenance on your account.

Checks – When you pay your credit card by check, never put your credit card’s full account number on the check, just write the last four digits. This will prevent someone in transit from harvesting your account number.

• Auction Fraud – This was the second most reported consumer fraud complaint to the FTC, totaling 51,000 auction complaints. The fraud is simple – put up a fake ad on eBay, let someone “win” the bid and send in their money, but never send out the merchandise. Make sure the seller has an established history before you click “buy.”

• Identity Theft or Credit Repair Scams — The Federal Trade Commission has warned that some companies that claim to be identity theft prevention companies are scam artists trying to get your driver’s license number, mother’s maiden name, Social Security number and credit and bank account numbers. If you are unsure about a firm, check it out with the Better Business Bureau at www.bbb.org .

Prize Scams – If someone calls you on the telephone and offers you the chance to receive a major prize but insists on gathering personal data first, ask them to send a written application in the mail. If they refuse, then hang up.

Credit Card Applications – Consider getting a secure mailbox (key access) as many identity thieves like to take your mail directly from the box (or from the trash), fill out your credit card applications and put their address in the information box. Always shred all credit card applications and contact your credit card companies to never release this information to other companies.

Ellie Kay
America’s Family Financial Expert (R)

 

The Top Twelve “Don’ts” for Deployments

I was a mom to five children who were seven years old and under and it was a wild time in our house when my fighter pilot husband deployed. There were some assignments when he was gone more than he was home and dealing with all those kids was simply chaos. But out of the chaos came creativity and new capabilities that were waiting for the right opportunity to emerge. There were things I learned to do and not to do in order to survive and thrive.

I wasn’t alone. Over the course of a decade, the combination of multiple deployments and limited time at home has weighed heavily on the families of military members who have fought two protracted ground wars. Those family members left at home have a significant role to play while their military loved one is deployed. While there are things they can do to make the separations more bearable, there are also certain activities to avoid. Along those lines, here are the “Top Twelve Don’ts for Deployment”

  1. Don’t have a negative attitude; it will hurt you, your kids, and everyone who is unfortunate enough to be around you! Keep the sour remarks off Facebook and twitter or anyplace your spouse can read them. You don’t want him or her distracted by your “stuff” because distractions can lead to accidents and accidents can lead to loss of life.
  2. Don’t spend time alone with people of the opposite sex; establish boundaries during this particularly vulnerable time.
  3. Don’t listen to your favorite love songs or romantic movies if it makes you nostalgic for your mate. Instead, watch a comedy with a friend.
  4. Don’t buy big-ticket items without your spouse’s approval—no matter how depressed you are. Instead, try to save money. For example, review the amount you are paying for home or auto insurance and try to get it cheaper. Be sure to check out USAA if you qualify to become a member.
  5. Don’t give in to impulse buying on the smaller-ticket items either; they will surely add up to big debts!
  6. Don’t clean out your spouse’s “stuff,” even if he never does listen to those old CDs!
  7. Don’t stay home alone—especially if you have little ones. Plug into your Family Support Group, LINKS, on base or join a MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) group in your area.
  8. Don’t turn down offers for help. Take people up on their offers to take you to lunch, come over for dinner, baby-sit your kids (if you trust them), and even bring you a casserole. Now is the time to accept help!
  9. Don’t overdose on news shows, especially when your spouse is involved in a “hot news” conflict. Don’t let your kids hear much (if any) of the news involving your spouse’s deployment. Even babies and toddlers can pick up on the vibe. Madeline Brazell says, “Andrew, who was only two when Duane went to war, started to exhibit disturbing behavior during the first days Duane’s deployment to the war when we kept the news on almost all day.”
  10. Don’t overdo it on TV in general—too much of it makes your brain turn to mush.
  11. Don’t use TV, DVDs, computers, or game systems as a babysitter. Limit their use to one show or one hour a day and your child will have a better outlook on life.
  12. Don’t list your physical address in the phone book or on any registration information. When a Stealth went down in Kosovo, and they didn’t know who the pilot was, CNN was standing curbside at every pilot’s house listed in the phone book!

How do YOU find you cope when your military member is deployed?

Thank you for being a Hero at Home and be sure to share this with a military family as your way of telling them, “Thanks for your service as a Hero at Home.”

Ellie Kay

 

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